Small Seal Script

figure 1 kanji etymology shin 172x300 172x300 - Kanji: 森

Kanji: 森

By Ponte Ryūrui / 20/06/2012 /

森 follows a concept of three pictographs of a tree (木, き, ki) combined in one character, and it emphasises thick tree growth, i.e. woods.

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figure 1 kanji etymology juu 221x300 221x300 - Kanji: 十

Kanji: 十

By Ponte Ryūrui / 12/04/2012 /

the shape of 十 was based on the concept of a vertically oblong tool used for calculations (Figures 1 and 2). Please also refer to the etymology of the

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figure 1 kanji etymology shu 210x300 210x300 - Kanji: 手

Kanji: 手

By Ponte Ryūrui / 08/04/2012 /

Although the modern form of the character 手 may be somewhat misleading (6 fingers), the “hand” radical 扌 still resembles the ancient pictographs. One must remember

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figure 1 kanji etymology shichi 221x300 221x300 - Kanji: 七

Kanji: 七

By Ponte Ryūrui / 08/03/2012 /

the symbolic meaning of the character 七, describing it as one of the sacred numbers (聖数, pinyin: shèngshù), which are further split into two groups

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figure 1 kanji etymology shi 300x247 300x247 - Kanji: 子

Kanji: 子

By Ponte Ryūrui / 19/01/2012 /

子 is believed to be ruled by the water element (one of the four elements of nature that define the Chinese zodiac, and those are: 木 {pinyin: mù, i.e.

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figure 1 hidari 214x300 214x300 - Kanji: 左

Kanji: 左

By Ponte Ryūrui / 17/12/2011 /

To fully understand the meaning of the character 左, one should combine it with the one of the character 右 (みぎ, migi, i.e. “right”), on which a

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figure 1 choosing calligraphy brush P1 179x300 179x300 - Searching for a Soul Mate – choosing a calligraphy brush. Part I

Searching for a Soul Mate – choosing a calligraphy brush. Part I

By Ponte Ryūrui / 09/12/2011 /

A calligraphy brush is not simply a tool used for writing. It is a warp gate to freedom of mind, a storyteller of artist soul’s secrets, a mysterious

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figure_1_sho_to_write

Importance of the stroke order in writing Chinese characters.

By Ponte Ryūrui / 02/07/2011 /

Not many people would give it a thought, but the stroke order (i.e. the order in which you write the lines of each kanji) is more important than it may seem

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