Semi Cursive Script

平仮名 (ひらがな, hiragana): き (i.e. "ki")

By Ponte Ryūrui / 16/08/2011 /

The modern form of き comes from the cursive form of the kanji 幾 (き, ki, i.e.: “how many”, “some”, etc.). Follow the progression of the different scripts

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平仮名 (ひらがな, hiragana): か (i.e. "ka")

By Ponte Ryūrui / 11/08/2011 /

The modern form of か comes from the cursive form of the kanji 加 (か, ka, i.e. “addition”, “increase”). Follow the progression of the different scripts shown

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figure_1_2_hiragana_a-horz

平仮名 (ひらがな, hiragana): あ (i.e. "a").

By Ponte Ryūrui / 12/07/2011 /

The modern form of the hiragana character あ comes from the cursive form of the kanji 安 (あん, an, i.e. “relaxed”, “cheap”, or “peaceful”).

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figure_1_sho_to_write

Importance of the stroke order in writing Chinese characters.

By Ponte Ryūrui / 02/07/2011 /

Not many people would give it a thought, but the stroke order (i.e. the order in which you write the lines of each kanji) is more important than it may seem

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Semi-cursive script (行書, gyousho)

By Beyond Calligraphy / 05/03/2010 /

Gyousho (行書, also known as walking or running style) was the last of five major styles to appear. It was the natural result of everyday handwriting. Whenever a calligrapher decided to put his thoughts down slightly faster and in more emotional manner he inadvertently laid foundations for a semi-cursive script. Gyousho is understood as a…

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Calligraphy Styles

By Beyond Calligraphy / 05/03/2010 /

In Chinese calligraphy we can distinguish five core styles: Seal script (篆書, tensho, further divided into great seal andsmall seal scripts) Clerical script (隷書, reisho) Cursive script(草書, sousho) Regular script (楷書, kaisho) Semi-cursive script (行書, gyousho) These do not entirely define the borders of calligraphy, as there are none to it. Each of the scripts…

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